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20121208
20121208
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)
as grover. no, not the muppet, but chief enforcer of the notorious norquist pledge against taxes. republican candidates for office must sign or risk defeat by right-wing candidates in primaries where a turnout of die-hard partisans can decide the outcome. among republican politicians, fear of grover has been greater even than fear of god, and such fear has kept republicans in congress from voting to raise taxes for 22 years, all the way back to 1990. mickey edwards was still in congress then. an eight-term representative from oklahoma, and a formidable leader among conservatives who nonetheless knew how to work with opponents to get things done. he chaired the republican policy committee, was a founding trustee of the conservative heritage foundation, and served as national chairman of the american conservative union. after redistricting by democrats cost him his seat in 1993, he taught at harvard and princeton, became vice president of the aspen institute, and wrote this book: "reclaiming conservatism: how a great american political movement got lost--and how it can find its way back." now
. and opposing tax increases doesn't change that reality. there's nothing in grover norquist's pledge that stops the ageing process. so there's no way the tax receipts of the 1960s will support the demographics of america in the 2030s. anyone who says otherwise is not taking the reality seriously. joining us is a man who always takes reality seriously. chris hayes. so one thing i always think is true in our political discussions is we don't like to face up to big changes. we like to use them as evidence for whatever policies are adapting. but the ageing of the society, i don't think we have come close to thinking about what that will mean for our economy or the government or any of it it. >> the only discussion we have is we're getting older so the entitlement programs will go bankruptcy. taking the reality seriously. joining us is a man who always takes reality seriously. chris hayes. so one thing i always think is true in our political discussions is we don't like to face up to big changes. we like to use them as evidence for whatever policies are adapting. but the ageing of the society, i don
increases doesn't change that reality. there's nothing in grover norquist's pledge that stops the ageing process. so there's no way the tax receipts of the 1960s will support the demographics of america in the 2030s. anyone who says otherwise is not taking the reality seriously. joining us is a man who always takes reality seriously. chris hayes. so one thing i always think is true in our political discussions is we don't like to face up to big changes. we like to use them as evidence for whatever policies are adapting. but the ageing of the society, i don't think we have come close to thinking about what that will mean for our economy or the government or any of it it. >> the only discussion we have is we're getting older so the entitlement programs will go bankruptcy. when you think about it, what does a mature society value and think about how you want to spend your marginal dollar. 25 maybe you want to buy an extra shot or get a video game system. >> i feel like you're making the 25-year-olds look a little trivial. >> if someone says you can spend a dollar to get an extra three month
's nothing in grover norquist's pledge that stops the aging process. if there was, i would take it. so there's no way the tax receipts of the 1960s will support the demographics of america in the 2020s or the 2030s. anyone who says otherwise is not taking the reality seriously. joining us is a man who always takes reality seriously. chris hayes. >> religiously. >> religiously. so one thing i always think is true in our political discussions is we don't like to face up to big changes. we like to use them as evidence for why whatever policies we support need to happen. but particularly the aging of this society, i don't think we've come anywhere close to thinking about what that will mean for the economy or the government or any of it it. >> the only discussion we have is we're getting older so the entitlement programs will go bankruptcy. we have to make cuts. when you think about it, what does a mature society value and how does it want to spend its marginal dollar. think as an individual, how do you want to spend it at 25 and how do you want to spend it at 75? at 25 maybe you want to buy an
in the outgoing 112th congress signed grover norquist's taxpayer protection pledge which is a promise to never raise taxes. at one point not signing the pledge would have been political suicide for republicans. now fears about the fiscal cliff and america's $16.3 trillion debt are pushing some, seen here, to renounce the pledge. i have been highlighting members of congress who said they are getting over grover. one of those members is tom cole of oklahoma. he signed the pledge and says he's not bound by it anymore. representative cole, a month ago you wrote allowing taxes to rise for just the top bracket may seem an acceptable middle ground by comparison. but this path would be enormously damaging to the economy, which meant you weren't going to do it. now you have been urnling your fellow congressmen to at least extend the bush era tax cuts to those making less than $250,000 and then do battle over tax cuts for the wealthy later. what changed your mind? >> first of all, nothing changed my mind. frankly you mischaracterized my position. i'm not for raising tax rates on anybody. i don't think i
on the right are going to be saying to boehner, we had pledged to grover norquist no tax increase at all and here you are agreeing to what is effectively a tax increase. and i think that both sides are going to have to give a little bit of something, and that 37% may be the golden median. >> doug, let's talk about the unemployment report that came out today. it shows 7.7% unemployment. you know, i know a lot of democrats want to say, oh, it's dropping, but it seems to me for months and months and months, the unemployment numbers have just remained awful. they move a little up and down, but they're just a mess. 12 million people unemployed. it seems to me that that could cut either way. republicans could still lean on that and say, you may be winning the pr war on this thing right now, but don't forget, you've got a big problem out there that you'll need our help on. >> i think there are three important things going on. the employment report was not strong. despite the top line number going down to 7.7%. the reason it fell is that another 350,000 people gave up looking entirely and left t
republicans to bring to step over to do this. and you're seeing grover norquist's grip fall apart. we really need to do this. this is a really important thing to do to improve the lives of young people. one thing to keep in mind, it is younger workers who are being hurt the most. the job gains are heavily among 55 and over. we don't want to have a society where we get cynical young people where there is no point in playing by the rules because you won't get a job any way. >> why not go over the cliff? if we go over the cliff, we're talking solving the financial problems. but we run the risk of another recession. i believe personally that we might dip a little bit, but it won't be anything like the first chart we showed. i mean, let's get rid of bush tax policy and start over. what about that? >> i think that that may well be a good idea. it's risky, ed. there's some risk as to what will happen. we don't know. but the fact is the government would then have all of this revenue. if it spends that revenue to create jobs and regardless of what the republicans say, government creates jobs all the
to praise him if they raise taxes and. the sort of grover norquist and he's a funny kind much a guy and during the interviews, endearing, and put the burden on him and the third is rebellion and charles krauthammer and steve forbes and the media like that story the least. >> i think there's a 6th story, jim. which is the media that quote progressive media of msnbc, tipping down to the white house to have an earnest chat to chat with the president about how important not going over the fiscal cliff is, and how important it is that they persuade their viewers to lean on those people who oppose them, so that they can actually avoid the cliff. that's amazing. >> you know, the media did not include the people who are not included, there was tom hartman, allen colmes and a lot of people who the white house left out of that meeting and in terms of who they put up and put out. media put out the story without doing their homework. >> there was a column by george will, bewitched by obama, even jonathan swift who said that promises and pie crusts are made to be broken and marvelled at the limi
the pledge republicans made to never raise taxes on the rich as per major domo grover norquist, who rivals the congressional leadership control over the very thought patterns of those who signed his pledge. grover's bound to go after republicans with impure thoughts who are being seduced, i heard these words myself on "meet the press," by the democrats. well, of course i was sitting about three feet from him. i wonder, are there enough members of the gop who study higher tax pornography with that seduce stuff? maybe this weekend have the impure thoughts thing we ought to call old-time supreme court justice potter stewart. "i will know it when i see it." sometimes i feel bad for the speaker, speaker boehner. he's caught between the elected obama and the unelected norquist crossfire. there's not a lot of room to maneuver in that space. tuesday we've got two big investor meetings. first there's dell world. dell world? i like kirby's fourth world. there's dell world. is the risk taken out of this one now? it's down so low. or does it even matter? deleveraged buyout as goldman hinted in its sel
to the heritage foundation he'll have to i think compete with the likes of grover norquist for the unelected leader of the republican party, because i think we'll hear from him and see a lot from him. i mean, you know, he may not have always picked candidates, thinking of murdoch and aiken, who won, but i would expect to see him continue to try to push the republican party, you know, as he did on the inside similarly from the outside using, you know, sort of the tools and the levers that the heritage foundation affords. i would just -- i would like to put in a plug for katon. i don't want to worry your chans so i'm going to resist giving my own endorsement, but you would be a wonderful addition inside republican party for voice of reason. >> look at that, katon dawson. take that the governor and see how much it helps you. >> karen just doomed my chances of winning because we don't agree on anything. i'm telling you, i put craig melvin's flame name in first th this morning. >> i'll say you're so unreasoning. >> i want you to speculate with me for a second. if it's not you, who else could it b
a lot of time talking about grover norquist, another person out of government in the mind of everyone serving in government. and that is a way to make change. >> ryan, we talked about the heritage foundation. and if he is going to be an activist, is heritage the right place to go? senator demint is the one who said if we're able to stop obama on the affordable care act, it will be his waterloo. it will break him. the idea for an individual mandate which is the centerpiece of the affordable care act was birthed at the heritage foundation. >> right. but i think jim demint can kind of shape the heritage foundation to his political will. and the fact that he is able to go to the heritage foundation actually says a lot about where the two parties are on the spectrum. you could never imagine a democratic senator the equivalent of demint. you know, you couldn't imagine somebody like bernie sanders, for instance. you couldn't imagine him going to run the center for progress there is too much daylight between the establishment in washington and the kind of left wing of the democratic party. wh
and he won't be signing grover norquist's tax pledge. welcome to you and best of luck in the future. but before that we're going to have this interview. >> thanks, ms. witt. >> let's talk about what needs to happen for you to put your support behind higher tax rates. >> i think we need to look beyond that. we need to look at why are we here now. this is something that's been put off for several years. this is a continuing problem. and that's one of the reasons we ran. it was the career politicians either led up to where they're at or failed to prevent it. that was the message that resounded in our district and that got us here. it got to the point where we really don't care who broke it, we just want it fixed. we need to put america first at this time. >> i'm curious how much you were able to absorb in orientation. i ask that bought your fellow freshman ann wagner compared it to drinking from a fire hose. what is your take? >> i heard that analogy a lot. there was a lot of information. but it was exciting. the first week i did feel like a fish out of water. certainly that doesn't sa
, after all the debate in washington, that violates the grover norquist americans for tax reform pledge. because you took away a tax break without giving an additional tax breaks or else. what we ought to do is give a break to our kids. >> host: next call, baby, you've been very patient. go ahead. >> caller: yes, but it's an honor to talk to you. pleasure to listen to you. i have two comments come one and social security. i the brother who is in his '60s and his two children under the age of 18. he received $1200 a month in social security. i about dropped when i heard that because him and his wife do not need that money. >> guest: how old is he? >> caller: 67 i think the. i never even knew that older americans who have children, were allowed to get social sturdy for the children. i was floored. if i am you know, interpreting this record the other comment was you are so right if the consumer had some money in the game as far as health care, i remember when our co-pay was $15 but i think i overuse my medical interest but as soon as it went to $25, i woke up and went, i don't want to pay
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)